Monday, January 29, 2007

Confessions of a Seed Catalog Junkie


I have stopped. I promise. No more ordering of seeds. I cannot promise that I won't pick up a few packets here and there, but no more ordering. I really don't know what gets into me. But, I need them, I want them, I can't refuse them a place in my garden. It's too much really. And there are seeds to use from last year! My garden will be overflowing. Good thing for me that I've made new beds...(I promise that I am not grinning maniacally and rubbing my hands together in an all-together much too crazy fashion. Really).
I'm quite ready for spring. I even braved cold temperatures yesterday to be outside working. Yesterday afternoon it started to snow and today we have a snow day. Monkey and I have been enjoying the day by painting together, making crepes, and keeping the fire going. I've also been working on my garden notebook for this year by creating the plant pages. I've come up with a general information sheet, which I then use to copy the seed packet onto using the color copier in my office. I have plenty of room to write notes and can keep a copy of the seed packet nice and clean for future reference.
I've already started leeks. I was hoping to start some shallots from seed, but was informed they won't show up until March. Now that the leeks are thin little slivers of green on a sunny shelf in my office, I want to start more seeds. But I will be patient and wait a little while longer. I have started more in the greenhouse - arugula, radishes, mache, and a few potatoes that sprouted in the cupboard. What I love best about my seed habit, is trying new varieties and keeping old favorites. I'm glad that I saved a few of the Kirby's Whippoorwill field peas from Bakers Creek because there were none to be had this year. I'll just have to save my own seeds to keep that one coming. So much promise in such a little thing. I'm an addict, all right.

9 comments:

  1. I'll host the intervention if you bring your seed packets along...

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  2. Maggie--

    I'm hoping to duplicate your addiction over the next couple of years, so puh-leeze don't stop now!

    Can I look at your garden notebook the next time we see you?

    --James

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  3. Molly Hamilton2:01 PM

    Maggie,
    I saw your post about organic flour on Liz's (Pocket Farm) blog, and I was wondering where and from whom you bought the organic flour. Was it grown in NC? I work for NCSU on organic grain production and want to make sure I know what is going on in the state with organic grains. Thanks!
    Molly
    molly_hamilton@ncsu.edu

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  4. Hi Maggie-
    ditto what Molly just said, except I'm a locavore from Greensboro and would really like some details about your local flour. I have a source of locally milled flour and cornmeal (Old Mill of Guilford) but from what I understand the wheat is not locally grown. I've been looking for local wheat flour and organic would certainly be a plus! Please leave a comment at my blog if you can give me more information.

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  5. Molly & Laurie -
    The flour is from Lindley Mills in Graham, NC. It's stone ground 100% organic. Perhaps it's just wishful thinking that it's from NC?
    My friend took me to the Farmer's Market. The stall is open everyday - lots of organic, although not all local foods. The man running it has a farm (J & S Farms) out towards Statesville. He's a big poultry man. We got into a long discussion about birds and rabbits. He raises rabbits and supplies our friend's restaurant. I have his card and I'll look for more details.

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  6. Molly Hamilton10:08 AM

    Maggie,
    Lindley Mills does buy organic wheat from some NC farms. However, there is not nearly enough organic wheat being grown in NC to meet their demand, so a lot of their wheat comes from the midwest. I (along with a lot of others through NCSU) are working to increase organic grain production in NC to meet the demand of companies like Lindley Mills. It would be much better for local and farm economies to have more organic grains grown in the state.
    Thanks for your response. I really like Lindley Mills flour.
    Molly

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  7. I share in your rubbing-hands-glee-ness. :) Oh yes.

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  8. I too can't help myself with seeds! I even find myself picking them up and then go home and find I already have the same things. I don't have land enough for all the seeds I would like to buy let alone the grow light space to get them started in time :-D At least this addiction is somewhat harmless!
    Monica

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  9. I think they sell Lindley Mills flour at the French Broad Co-op, too. It is labeled local, glad to know the facts.

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